Home » Gorilla News » Ostriches are generally silent but during mating season…-Uganda safari news

Ostriches are generally silent but during mating season…-Uganda safari news

Did you know that an ostrich’s eye is bigger than its brain?

The pearl of Africa is well known for very many tourists’ activities but the most common one is Gorilla trekking in Uganda Bwindi impenetrable forest/Uganda gorilla safaris.

So, on any Uganda safari tour or from your gorilla trekking safari in Rwanda don’t ever miss out to see an ostrich a great bird in Uganda.

uganda safari toursAn ostrich is well known as a flightless and a largest bird in the whole world. This bird is always found in Savannah grass lands. Therefore, in Uganda it can be found in Kidepo Valley National park.

An ostrich is gifted with a longest neck with one rounded eye with a tiny brain. It also has two toes and this makes it the fastest running bird. You can differentiate the male and female ostrich according coloration. The adult male ostrich has brown eyes, black body feathers with white wings and a long tail where as a female ostrich is often brown.

An ostrich has got strong legs and it always use them for its defense.

Ostriches are generally silent but during mating season, they display a collection of roars, booms and hisses.

The male bird is known for its booming call which is a deep vibrant hooo hooo hooomph hooo that you can sometimes mistake it for a lion’s roar. This sound can be heard over 1 km,

Ostriches have an interesting propagation system where the major and the minor birds can lay eggs in the same nest; usually one major and 5-6 minor laying an average of 25 eggs in the same nest.

In preparation for incubation the major hen incubates during the day while the Cock takes its turn during the night and the chicks usually hatch after 6 weeks and leave the nest after 4 days.

The chicks then join other young ostriches to form displays that can have more than 100 young birds.

For more and more of this information, please contact Prime Uganda safaris.

 

 

 

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